Monday, 13 August 2012

2 more 'On this Day' Challenge Quilts

The explanation behind these challenge quilts from our 2012 QQ Exhibition. 
We are happy to share our guidelines with other groups who are proposing a challenge for their exhibitions.  Alternatively, we could arrange to lend our quilts to other guilds for exhibition.
This has been one of our most popular challenges.

We were able to access digitised newspapers in the National Library of Australia for all the papers used.



ON THIS DAY
The Challenge this year was set by Robyn McPherson and Kay White. Participants were asked to provide a date between the 1st January 1901 and the 5th September 2011. They were also to pick a number between 2 and 10.

Each quilter participating in the challenge then received the front page of the Queanbeyan Age and the page corresponding to the number they had picked, for the date they had provided. If the Queanbeyan Age had not been published the participants were provided with pages from the Daily Telegraph or Sydney Morning Herald. Up to 3 entries per date were permitted and extra dates could be purchased.

The Challenge was then to take something from either of the pages and make a quilt representing that. The quilt could be any shape but needed to have a least one point on each side able to touch the sides of a 24inch square.

The quilt could be made using any technique but was to at least 75% black, grey and white fabric. The only other colour allowed was red (or shades of ) which had to be a minimum of 5% and a maximum of 25%.


Cassandra used the headline from her 9 September 1977 Queanbeyan Age newspaper  to recreate the early building stages of the Karabar Shopping Centre. 
Cassandra has also added more quilting to this quilt since the exhibition. I love the reflections in the front window and the addition of the motor bike.



Robyn felt that there wasn't anything quilt worthy in the stories of her 3 May 1948 newspaper. She took the selling price printed under the newspaper name which was 2d.
Remember pennies?
Newspaper boys would stand at the station and call '2d. Tuppence for a Herald.

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